• Robert O Young DSc, PhD

Are YOU Following a CON-VIT-DIE-IT or a pH Miracle Alkaline LIVE-IT Lifestyle?

An Acidic Die-it and Lifestyle Is More Deadly Than Smoking and the Cause of Heart Attacks, Diabetes, Cancer & the any So-called Infectious Disease like HIV or Coronavirus!


A new landmark study published in the Lancet found that, poor or acidic diet is responsible for more than 1 in 5 deaths globally, making it more deadly than tobacco.



Consuming both low amounts of healthy alkaline foods and high amounts of unhealthy acidic foods are key to these findings.


These unhealthy highly acidic foods include, beef, chicken, pork, duck, turkey, fish, dairy, eggs, vinegar, sugar, alcohol, vinegar, carbonated drinks, energy drinks, coffee, black tea, just to name a few.

The healthy alkaline foods include, low sugar fruit like tomato, avocado, grapefruit, cucumber, peppers of all colors, lemon and lime and vegetables, such as broccoli, spinach, arugula, celery, cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, ginger, turmeric just to name a few.

What you put on your plate can play a serious role in how likely you are to die before your time: According, to the study, a poor or acidic diet is actually the leading cause of death worldwide, contributing to more of them than conventional risk factors like tobacco use.




In the study, researchers analyzed food consumption habits of adults ages 25 and older from 1990 to 2017 in 195 countries and compared how their diet affected their chances of premature death.


They found that in 2018, 11 million deaths—or 35 percent—worldwide were caused by a poor acidic diet. More specifically? Of these deaths, 9.5 million were due to cardiovascular disease, over 900,000 to diet-related cancers, over 330,000 to diabetes, and over 136,000 to kidney diseases. NOW that is a REAL PANdemic!


On the other hand, more commonly known risk factors like high blood pressure and tobacco use was linked to 10.4 million and 8 million deaths, respectively. Researchers also found that a poor acidic diet is linked to more years lived with disability, too.


According to Dr. Robert O Young at the pH Miracle Research Center, USA, “an acidic diet is a Worldwide equal opportunity killer and the number 1 cause of ALL sickness and disease!”



The following are the references to this very important 27 year Lancet published study validating the work of Dr. Robert O Young, who suggested in 1984 that there is only one sickness, one disease and one treatment. To learn more about the one sickness, one disease and one treatment read, The pH Miracle revised and updated book and Sick and Tired, Reclaim YOUR Inner Terrain. You can order these two books at: www.phmiracleproducts.com


This one sickness and one disease was described by Dr. Young as the over-acidification of the blood and then interstitial fluids of the Interstitium due to an inverted way of living, eating, drinking, breathing, thinking, feeling and believing.


Dr. Young has suggested that there was only one treatment in order to restore the alkaline design of the body fluids by using an alkaline lifestyle and diet as described in his research, published papers and books, such as, A Nutritional Approach to the Prevention and Treatment of Any Cancerous Condition, A Finger on the Magic of Life, The pH Miracle, The pH Miracle revised and update, The pH Miracle for Weight Loss, The pH Miracle For Diabetes, The pH Miracle for the Heart and The pH Miracle for Cancer.


For those looking for more understanding about viruses, vaccines and the Coronavirus read the following books and publications:


1) Second Thoughts about Viruses, Vaccines, and the HIV/AIDS Hypothesis Aug 2, 2016


2) THE POSSIBLE CAUSE OF POLIO, POST-POLIO, CNS, PVIPD, LEGIONNAIRES, AIDS and the CANCER EPIDEMIC – MASS ACIDIC CHEMICAL POISONING? Oct 19, 2016



3) Chlorine Dioxide (CL02) As a Non-Toxic Antimicrobial Agent for Virus, Bacteria and Yeast (Candida Albicans)



You can find Dr. Young's published research at: www.drrobertyoung.com or his books at: www.phmiracleproducts.com



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